2014 Oct. 21: A tribute to the late lover

Phumy (Phumzile Nkosi) and Pretty Nanto met in 2010 December 31.
We fell in love and promised each other that “till death do us part,” and it did 4 years later.

She was amazingly smart, caring, loving, supportive, brave and the strongest person I have ever met.

Phumy was my first girlfriend and she was the best person I’ve ever met, because she loved me and I was her princess.

When I was with her we were always happy and that was the amazing thing, she always wanted us to be happy “HAPPINESS”.

She was one of those loving souls, I loved her, and she became someone so special or let me say a blessing. When I met her I never realized she can be such.

Although sometimes we had disagreements and arguments but she never laid a hand on me, that was the promise she made and kept.

We wouldn’t sleep or go a day without talking to each other because we believed that two people being in love means you can’t live without one another.

She was a special person and will always be in my Heart.

Losing her was the last thing in my thoughts.
Since she left me I feel like I am a foreigner living in the wrong world where she is not in.

Everyday depression is taking place, I really don’t understand why she had to leave me in this sad way, that she doesn’t deserve.

I feel if I was there with her such wouldn’t have happened because with each other nothing went wrong.

I’m really breaking apart everyday, losing her has really changed how happy and bubbly I was.

We would call each other every day or do callbacks if we have no airtime.
Now that beautiful voice is gone, I am crying every day.

In my life she became someone wonderful and I don’t think I would ever have such a soul.

It’s been weeks since she’s been gone, but still feels new to me that she is gone.

I’m trying very hard to be strong, and the more I try, the more it hurts deeply.

I’m strong around people but when I’m alone it all comes back and I sometimes feel like I’m losing myself because I’m often in tears and feeling empty.

So here I am all alone, singishiyile isthandwa sam’.  No one has ever treated me like her, because with her nothing mattered everything was well.

We’ve been through a lot together and she never gave up on us through all the sadness.

Intlupheko yethu (our poverty) was known by us and we wouldn’t show anyone but our love kept us together.

All that’s left now is memories and that she loved me very much.

In my life I don’t think I will ever meet such a person there was only ONE PHUMY for me.

Even if I can move on she will remain loved and no else will ever receive the love I have for her.

Every day when I wake up its very different and unique I’m no longer confident I am really confused and have lots of questions of why.

I feel she is going to call me or I will call her so I can hear that voice saying ”DOODO’.

In my life I made a promise to her that I will take care of our boys Thulani and Phumlani because that is what she always asked me if anything happens to her.

This thing will make me happy and even her soul will rest in peace. She will always remain in my memories and I’m proud of her.
Love you my dodo…

 

Phumzile Nkosi_9603

 

 

Previous link

 

2014 Oct. 13:  Mother of the recently murdered lesbian demands justice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in "Till death do us apart", 1986-2014, A tribute, Article, Boys orphaned by violence, Brutality, Family, Friendships, Life, Love, Loved, murdered, Phumzile Nkosi, Pretty Nanto, Relationships, Stabbed to death, Tears, Tsakane | Leave a comment

2014 Oct. 21: SA Lesbian Feathers of the Year

 

Bev Ditsie and Zanele Muholi © Photo by Lindeka Qampi (2014)

Bev Ditsie and Zanele Muholi both won Feathers of the Year. Ditsie in 2012 and Muholi in 2013.
© Photo by Lindeka Qampi (2014)

They are both South African lesbian icons. Most influential in different ways.
Some of the commonalities between them is their sexuality and being born in South Africa during the ’70s. Bev from Soweto and Zanele in Umlazi township.

About Bev Palesa Ditsie

Bev. is an activist, filmmaker, musician, actor, television producer and director.
She was at the forefront of the LGBT rights in South Africa and beyond through the whole of the 1990s. She was instrumental in founding the gay rights organisation GLOW, creating and contributing to public conversations regarding gay rights, women’s rights, human rights, influencing policy and raising awareness, and was one of the organisers of South Africa’s first Gay Pride March.
She is also the first gay African woman to address the United Nations.

She has been working in the television industry since the age of 10 as an actor and voice over artist.

In the past 18 years Bev has worked as a Director, Content Director and Series Director on music videos, variety, education shows, documentaries, and reality television shows such as Big Brother Africa, Master Chef SA, All You Need Is Love and Survivor South Africa seasons to date.

Awards and Citations

1994 June 17 Bev Ditsie/ Simon Nkoli Day, Washington DC, USA
1994 July 05 Bev Ditsie/ Simon Nkoli Day, San Francisco, USA
1995 June 12 Citation (Key of the City) Philadelphia, Penn, USA
1995 Nov.      Main Speaker at the 4th United Nations Conference on Women, Beijing
2004 March “Simon and I” Oxfam/ Vues d’Afrique best documentary, Montreal, Canada
2006 June  – Lifetime Achievement Award: GALA
2012 Feather of the Year award

Published Writing

Contributing writer – Curve Magazine, USA – 2000
Contributing writer – Tribute Woman, Tribute Magazine – 1997
Columnist – “Bev’s beat” – Outright Magazine 1995 – 1998

Zanele Muholi is a visual activist and was born in Umlazi, Durban, and lives in Johannesburg.
Muholi co-founded the Forum for Empowerment of Women (FEW) in 2002.
In 2009, founded Inkanyiso (www.inkanyiso.org) queer & visual (activists) media.

Muholi mission is to re-write a black queer and trans visual history of South Africa for the world to know of our resistance and existence at the height of hate crimes in SA and beyond.
Muholi continues to train and co-facilitates photography workshops to young women in the townships.
Current project: 2014 PhotoXPa collaboration with three women at Aurora Girls High School, Soweto.

She studied Advanced photography at the Market Photo Workshop in Newtown, Johannesburg.
In 2007 – 2009 studied MFA: Documentary Media at Ryerson University, Toronto.

Muholi is an Honorary Professor of the University of the Arts/Hochschule für Künste Bremen.

Her Faces and Phases series has shown on Documenta 13; the South African Pavilion at the 55th Venice Biennale, Imaginary Fact: South African art and the archive; and the 29th São Paulo Biennale; a book of the series published by Steidl Press will be launched in Ulm, Germany in Sept. 2014.

 

Awards
2013
Fine Prize – Emerging artist, Carnegie International
Prince Claus Award
Feather Award – Feather of the Year 
Mbokodo Award – Creative photography
Index on Censorship – Freedom of Expression art award
Campaigner of the Year, Glamour magazine

2009
Jean-Paul Blachère Award, Les Rencontres de Bamako biennial of African photography
Casa Africa Award for best female photographer, Les Rencontres de Bamako biennial of African photography
Fanny Ann Eddy accolade by the International Resource Network in Africa (IRN-Africa)
LGBTI Art & Culture Award

Publications

  • Faces and Phases (2006 – 2014)
  • Zanele Muholi: African Women Photographers #1  (2011)
  • Faces and Phases  (2010)
  • Only half the Picture  (2006)

 

 

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2014 Oct. 22: Paris meets Aurora Young Female Photographers

by Thobe Gumede

It is Tuesday, 21st Oct. 2014 in the afternoon at Aurora GHS where guest speakers come and share expertise with young photographers.

The interaction started with a traditional icebreaker, a good meal, brought by the visitor for the photography learners at Aurora Girls High School. The learners had been waiting in anticipation to meet the guest speaker of the day, Veronica Noseda, a member of Equipe Les Dégommeuses, Paris, France.

 

The AGHS PhotoXP learners after guest speaking session. © Lerato Dumse (2014)

The AGHS PhotoXP learners after guest speaking session.
© Lerato Dumse (2014)

 

Introductions were in order and the learners were happy to hear that Veronica was impressed with their work. She liked the fact that the learners have their personal perspectives and own realities’ which is priceless and is a great start to being good photographers, writers or filmmakers.

They were both excited and shy to introduce themselves until the journalist, soccer player and activist introduced herself to the students, and later emphasized that, that’s how the learners should also introduce themselves wherever they are, clear, loud and proud.

Veronica shared with them that she spent the past 15 years living in France and it is during these years that she met Zanele Muholi, a South African activist and a photographer who initiated the meeting, and worked with her on a number of projects including the documentary which was screened minutes later.

The documentary titled “Foot for Love” by Equipe Les Dégommeuses was screened at Aurora Girls High School for the 2014 PhotoXP learners was produced during the 2012 Paris Pride week in France.
It tells the story of trip that Thokozani Football Club (TFC) took and how they spent their time in Paris.
The team is named after Thokozani Qwabe, a young lesbian victim of hate crime who was murdered in 2007.
The documentary played on the small screen laptop and the learners gathered closely. Veronica translated when people in the documentary spoke in French to ensure that the viewers understood what was going on.

Discussions followed after the screening, and then there were questions and answers.
Q1. How did the French audience react when they saw black South African lesbians parading on their streets?

VN Answer: The French were both welcoming and curious and some of them joined in after they find out what the parade was about.

Q2. Did you get support from the community?

Answer: Yes, the community showed great support and they were extremely happy to march and sing with the Thokozani Football Team.

Q3. What challenges did you face when you edited the documentary?

VN Answer: There weren’t that many challenges other than technical problems of which were overcome easily since it was a collective project, the documentary cost nothing and some of the people volunteered with their skills and some provided their video footage.
Sometimes we would post on facebook to ask for assistance with fixing technical challenges that were beyond us.

Q4. What is your organization doing for the Thokozani Football Club?

VN: Our organization worked with Thokozani Football Club to show solidarity and visibility of black South African lesbians at the height of hate crimes in South Africa. This was to show the realities of what is currently going on in SA which is not seen on mainstream television in France.

Q#5. How different or similar is the lesbian scene in France compared to the South African lesbians?

VN: We don’t know about hate crimes but some of us are also discriminated against and face a lot of homophobia as well.

Veronica went on to explain that the visual part of the documentary was to start conversations about human rights issues such as women’s rights to equality, homosexuality and so forth.

She also stressed to the learners that everything is interesting, explaining to them how important it is to observe things that happen around them, and encouraging them to take more photos and videos.
A follow up documentary titled Team Spirit was produced and directed by Thembela ‘Terra’ Dick which focuses on the lives of some TFC soccer players back in Umlazi township, Durban.
It was premiered at IFAS, Johannesburg during the International Day Against Homophobia (IDAHO).

 

 

Related articles

 

 

2014 Oct. 16: The lawyer in the classroom

 

 

and

 

Previous links

 

2014 Oct.:  Long trip to Cape Town from Johannesburg

 

and

 

2014 Oct. 7:  Robbed while shooting

 

and

 

2014 Sept. 30:  “I truly love Cape Town”

 

and

 

2014 Aug. 30: Insightful analysis from the guest speaker

 

and

 

2014 Aug. 30: Young aspiring photographers experimenting lithography

 

and

 

2014 Aug. 28: Fine Artists on importance of being creative

 

and

 

2014 Aug.1: InterGenerational conversation with current and future stars

 

and

 

2014 July 16: Through the eyes of young women photographers

 

and


2014 July 12:   From Soweto to Paris for the love of photography

 

and

 

2014 July 13:  “Give children cameras not candies”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in 2012 Paris Pride, Another Approach Is Possible, Archived memories, Art Is A Human Right, Art is Queer, Art Solidarity, Articles, Articulation, Artist Talk, Arts & Culture, Arts & Sports, As we are, Attention, Audience, “Foot for Love", Beautiful faces, Beautiful people, Before US, Before You, Being conscientized, Blackness, Captioned, Captured, Career, Caring citizens, Caring for our female youth, Celebrating Women, Celebration, Characters, Citizenship, Comment, Comments from the audience, Commitment, Community based media, Community education, Community outreach, Community work, Connected souls, Connections, Consideration, Creating awareness, Description, Details, Different positions, Documentary screening, Documentation; Filming; Photography; Community, Documenting our own lives, Documenting realities of the townships, Education, educator at Aurora Girls High School, Emotional support, Empowerment, Equipe Les Degommeuses, From Paris to Soweto, Introductions, Reviving the culture of reading and writing, revolution, Sharing, soccer player, Social responsibility, Solidarity, South Africa, South African townships, South African visual history through the eyes of young women, Speaking for ourselves, Support, Supporters, Supporting each other, Teaching young women photography, Testimonies from Aurora photographers, Textualizing Our Own Lives, Thobe Gumede, Time, together, Together we can, Veronica Noseda, Videographer, Visibility, Vision, Visual activism, Visual activism is a language, Visual democracy, Visual historical initiative, Visual history, Visual history is a Right not a luxury, Visual Language, Visual Power, Visual Voices, We Are You, We Care, We Love Photography, We Still Can with/out Resources, We were (t)here, Women's power, Women's Work, Women; Voices; Writings; Education; Traditions; Struggles; Cultures, Writing is a Right, Young Black Women and Photography, Young female photographers from Aurora, Youth voices | 1 Comment

2014 Oct. 16: The lawyer in the classroom

Report by Lerato Dumse & Zanele Muholi
Photos by Thobe Gumede

 

Mpho Nefuri wt Young Female Photographers @ Aurora Girls High School SOWETO_0417

 

 

Mpho Nefuri wt YFP @ AGHS_0412

Our guest speaker of the day, Mpho Nefuri (attorney) in a black suit, front row shared so much expertise with our young photographers at Aurora on Thurs. 16 Oct. 2014.         © Photos by Thobe Gumede (2014)

 

Where:  Aurora Girls High School, SOWETO
What:  2014 PhotoXP – Guest speaking

Mpho Nefuri was our guest speaker of the day, she addressed the young female photographers on how Media and Law works. She explained to the learners the do’s and don’ts when approaching visual subject matters. The importance of taking precautions, avoiding risks and requesting for consent before photographing.

After handing in an urgent application at the Pretoria High Court on October 16, attorney Mpho Nefuri dashed to Aurora Girls High School in Soweto.

There, a group of 13 teenage girls who are part of the project waited for Mpho, the latest guest speaker to share knowledge with them.

She started on a light note, thanking and advising of the learners who responded to her greeting in Venda language, to teach her peers.

Adding, “The fact that we are in Soweto doesn’t mean you can’t speak Venda.”
She said that before apologizing for having kept the girls waiting and said, “I wouldn’t miss an opportunity to contribute in an initiative like this, hence I kept begging to say please wait and tell the learners to please wait I’m coming.”

The attorney then explained to the group that one reason for her visit is to share with them what it means to be a photographer in the legal sphere.

Mpho then asked the girls, what makes a photographer? To which Thando Methane responded by saying, “Photographers are people who document different struggles in life, because some people can’t express their views by speaking, but do so by taking photographs.”

Mpho told the photographers to respect the guidelines given on taking photos, be polite and make good judgment.

The learners were also advised to be innovative and authentic in their photography, and to copyright their photos in order to protect their work.
Some learners shared their reflections on Mpho’s visit.

Sindisiwe Ncube: I was glad to learn something new today. We were taught about how the law protects photographers, and the pictures we take.
Mpho also told us about the difference between public and private places. Since I started photographing, I’ve had experiences in some places were I was not allowed to shoot, and I never understood.
Today Mpho explained it clearly. I was surprised to hear that there is a subject called Media Law. As someone who loves media, knowing how the law works with it, is just priceless.

Nomthandazo Sibanyoni: I’ve learnt that photography has to do with public and private places. That in everything I do, I should be aware of people’s property and private life. I should not take private things into public places, because in that way, I will be violating that person’s right, and might end up in court. 
Being a photographer means I should have knowledge about the industry. Having laws in this country is to protect a person’s rights because some companies don’t want their products pictured and their ideas stolen.
Mpho said we should learn being innovative and authoritative. Photographer’s are protected by media law.

Kamo Petlele: Today I enjoyed the meeting, learned I have to know our rights as photographers and the boundaries. I only thought because am a photographer I can shoot anything I want, thanks for the knowledge.

The young minds were thrilled and continued to pose so many questions afterwards of which Mpho responded to with humility. Due to time limit and lateness, the learners had to go home and Mpho promised to conduct a second session with the learners in the near future.

Previous guest speakers includes Phumla Masuku, Nonkululeko Britton-Masekela, Mfundi Mvundla, Gabi Ngcobo, Jamy-Lee Brophy, Megan Heilig, Martha Qumba, Ziyanda Majozi, and Busisiwe Radebe, who shared their expertise with the learners.

The learners attended various field trips in which they documented and learnt from those experiences.

 

Previous links

2014 Oct.:  Long trip to Cape Town from Johannesburg

 

and

 

2014 Oct. 7:  Robbed while shooting

 

and

 

2014 Sept. 30:  “I truly love Cape Town”

 

and

 

2014 Aug. 30: Insightful analysis from the guest speaker

 

and

 

2014 Aug. 30: Young aspiring photographers experimenting lithography

 

and

 

2014 Aug. 28: Fine Artists on importance of being creative

 

and

 

2014 Aug.1: InterGenerational conversation with current and future stars

 

and

 

2014 July 16: Through the eyes of young women photographers

 

and


2014 July 12:   From Soweto to Paris for the love of photography

 

and

 

2014 July 13:  “Give children cameras not candies”

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in 2014 Cape Town Month of Photography, 2014 Photo XP, About PhotoXP, Act, Acting, Activism, Activists, Activists Act, Advocacy, Allies, Alternative family, Announcement, Another Approach Is Possible, Art Activism, Art Edutainment, Article, Articles, Articulation, Attention, Aurora Girls High School, Background, Beautiful faces, Bringing photography to the community, Cameras, Captioned, Captured, Career, Caring citizens, Celebrating Women, Celebration, Characters, Citizenship, Claiming, Claiming mainstream spaces, Class, Collaborations, Collective, Collectivism, Comments from the audience, Commitment, Committed, Communication strategies, Community education, Community Mobilizing, Community work, Connected souls, Consideration, Conversation, Crea(c)tive senses, Creating awareness, Democracy, Details, Documentation; Filming; Photography; Community, Documenting our own lives, Documenting realities of the townships, Education, Emotional support, Empowerment, Evidence, Experience, Exposure, Expression, Eyes, Facing You, Faith, Family, Feelings, Friends, Friendships, Gender activist, Health bodies, Hope, Human rights, I am not the only one, I am Somebody, I can't do it ALONE, I love photography, I was (T)here, I was here, Ignorance, Interpretation, Intervention, Introduction, Lawyers in the classroom, Learning, Let us give a girl child a chance, Life, Life is a production..., Life Stories, Linda Mankazana, Lindeka Qampi, Living, Love, Love is a human right, Love is Queer, Lovely words, Mainstream media, Media works, Memory, My body, Organizing, Peers, Perception, Photos by Thobe Gumede, Power of the Arts, Power of the Voice, Presentation, Relationships, Remembering, Report, Respect, revolution, the attorney, We Are You | 1 Comment

2014 Oct. 18: With Young Queer Youth Leaders in KwaThema

 

2014 Oct 18 Young Queer Activists in KwaThema ft Veronica Noseda_0659

Photo by Liza Mokae (2014)

Spent the day with young queer youth in KwaThema.
Thanks to Lebo Mashifane for organizing the event.

Posted in 20 Years of Democracy in SA, Activists, Activists Act, After party, Another Approach Is Possible, Archived memories, Art Activism, Art Is A Human Right, Art is Queer, Articles, Beauty, Visibility, Visual activism, Visual Activist, Visual democracy, Visual diaries, Visual history, Visual history is a Right not a luxury, Visual Language, Visual narratives, Visual Power, Visual sense, Visual Voices, Warmth, We Are You, We Care, We love photographs, We Still Can with/out Resources, We were (t)here | Leave a comment

2014 Oct. 17: SA Fashion Week photo of the night

 

Ally & Toya DaLezy @ SA Fashion Week, Crowne Plaza, Rosebank. © Zanele Muholi (2014)

Ally & Toya DaLezy @ SA Fashion Week, Crowne Plaza, Rosebank.
© Zanele Muholi (2014)

Posted in 20 Years of Democracy in SA, 2014 SA Fashion Week, Abantu, Act, Acting, Activists Act, Affair, Allies, Ally & Toya DaLezy, Another Approach Is Possible, Art Activism, Art Activism in South Africa, Article, Articles, Articulation, Artists, Arts, Arts & Culture, As we are, Attention, Beautiful, Beautiful faces, Beautiful people, Before US, Before You, Black Queer & Gifted, Blackness, Bringing photography to the community, Captioned, Captured, Caring citizens, Celebrating Women, Celebration, Characters, Citizenship, Claiming mainstream spaces, Class, Consideration, Conversation, Creating awareness, Culture of reading and writing, Dress sense, Emotional support, Empowerment, Event, Evidence, Excitement, Experience, Exploration, Expression, Fashion, Fashionista, Feelings, Female Photographers, Friends, Friendships, Gender articulation, Gender expression, He(ART), Health bodies, Honesty, Hope, Human Beings, Human rights, I can't do it ALONE, I was (T)here, I was here, Interpretation, Intervention, Knowledge, Label, Life, Life story, Living, Love, Love is a human right, Love is Queer, Loved, Mainstream media, Photographs, Photography, Photography as a therapy, Platform, Politics of existence, Politics of representation, Power of the Arts, Power of the Voice, Pride, Privilege, Proud to be, Race, Recognition, Reflections, Relationships, relative, Self-worth, Sexual orientation, Sexuality in South Africa, Sharing knowledge, Sharing thoughts, She, South Africa, Speaking for ourselves, Statement, Style, Time, Together we can, Togetherness, Touch, Visibility, Vision, Visual Activist, Visual Arts, Visual diaries, Visual history, Visual history is a Right not a luxury, Visual Language, Visual Power, Visual sense, Visual Voices, Visualizing public spaces, Visuals, We Are You, We Care, We love photographs, We Love Photography, We Still Can with/out Resources, We were (t)here, Well organized event, When Love is a Human Right | Leave a comment

2014 Oct. 15: Dignified funeral for LGBTI and HIV activist

by Lerato Dumse

Kind, compassionate, diligent and loving are some of the words used by speakers, to describe Musa Williams (47).

How he performed his duties at work, and his activism fighting for the rights of LGBTI and HIV positive people.

They were talking during his funeral on Wed. October 15, held at his home in Kwa-Thema, where he died suddenly a week before.

The funeral service started with less than 10 people, who sang in the lounge where Musa’s coffin stood.

People were then given an opportunity to view him for the last time, before moving to the tent where the full program was carried out.

Fani Masemula was first to talk, speaking on behalf of the family.

He said they were saddened by Musa’s passing, but realised it is the community he helped that has suffered the biggest loss.

Next on the program was a neighbor Sibusiso who said, Musa was a brother and a friend to him.

He added that Musa taught him how to handle tough times, and Musa’s passing is his first test at handling such a situation.

Nontyatyambo Makapela shared memories of Musa, when he joined them in establishing TAC in KwaThema.

How he used his own resources to mobilize people, even though he was part of the National Association of People Living with HIV and AIDS (NAPWA).

She said that was testament of Musa’s passion in helping those affected by HIV in his community.

Just like the meaning of his name, Nontyatyambo said she saw him practice kindness in other people’s lives.

 

2014 Oct. 15 Thokozile Khulwane_9683

Mrs Thokozile Khulwane preaching during the funeral service…

“Musa had characteristics of a leader, he was able to save many lives and prove that HIV doesn’t kill, but societal stigma does,” she concluded.

While long time friend, Sevi Makhonjwa said Musa’s life purpose was to serve people and “God must be giving him a lots of correct ticks because he stepped up to his call.

Sevi spoke about how they were together with Musa burying another friend and activist Manku Maduwane just last month, not far from Musa’s home.

With the funeral service at home wrapped up, mourners then proceeded to Vlakfontein Cemetery.

 

Pastor T. Moema who prayed at the funeral service of Musa Williams

Pastor T. Moema who prayed at the funeral service of Musa Williams

 

2014 Oct. 15 Lindeka Qampi @ Musa s place_9673

Lindeka Qampi, photographer who documented the service for Inkanyiso

 

Members of the LGBTI community, HIV activists and colleagues he worked with as community health care workers, marched some distance in front of the hearse singing.

There was a slight drizzle, which looked threatening when mourners arrived at the cemetery.
However this did not disrupt the smooth service, as the sun soon came out shining.

While some worked hard with spades to cover Musa’s grave, others continued singing, saying their final goodbye to a man they called IQHAWE!

 

2014 Oct. 15 Ingubo _9894

Musa’s coffin wrapped with blue blanket as a sign of respect for the late activist…

 

 

Supporters_9905

Young queer leaders and activists from KwaThema and surrounding areas came in full support…

 

Supporters_9913

 

Indlu yokugcina_9938

                                   Final resting place for Musa, “You’ll never be forgotten…”                                                      © Photos by Zanele Muholi (2014)

 

 

 

Previous article

 

2014 Oct. 13: Mother of the recently murdered lesbian demands justice

 

 

and

 

 

2014 Sept. 28: An emotional farewell for the recent victim of hate crime

 

 

and

 

 

2014 Sept. 8: Manku and her niece buried next to each other

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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