2014 Oct. 16: The lawyer in the classroom

 

Mpho Nefuri wt Young Female Photographers @ Aurora Girls High School SOWETO_0417

 

 

Mpho Nefuri wt YFP @ AGHS_0412

Our guest speaker of the day, Mpho Nefuri (attorney) in a black suit, front row shared so much expertise with our young photographers at Aurora on Thurs. 16 Oct. 2014.         © Photos by Thobe Gumede (2014)

 

Where:  Aurora Girls High School
What:  2014 PhotoXP – Guest speaking

Mpho Nefuri was our guest speaker of the day, she addressed the young female photographers on how Media and Law works. She explained to the learners the dos and don’ts when approaching visual subject matters. The importance of taking precautions, avoiding risks and requesting for consent before photographing.

The young minds were thrilled and posed so many questions afterwards of which Mpho responded to with humility.

Previous guest speakers includes Phumla Masuku, Nonkululeko Britton-Masekela, Mfundi Mvundla, Gabi Ngcobo, Jamy-Lee Brophy, Megan Heilig, Martha Qumba, Ziyanda Majozi, and Busisiwe Radebe, who shared their expertise with the learners.

The learners attended various field trips in which they documented and learnt from those experiences.

 

Previous links

2014 Oct.:  Long trip to Cape Town from Johannesburg

 

and

 

2014 Oct. 7:  Robbed while shooting

 

and

 

2014 Sept. 30:  “I truly love Cape Town”

 

and

 

2014 Aug. 30: Insightful analysis from the guest speaker

 

and

 

2014 Aug. 30: Young aspiring photographers experimenting lithography

 

and

 

2014 Aug. 28: Fine Artists on importance of being creative

 

and

 

2014 Aug.1: InterGenerational conversation with current and future stars

 

and

 

2014 July 16: Through the eyes of young women photographers

 

and


2014 July 12:   From Soweto to Paris for the love of photography

 

and

 

2014 July 13:  “Give children cameras not candies”

 

 

 

 

 

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2014 Oct. 18: With Young Queer Youth Leaders in KwaThema

 

2014 Oct 18 Young Queer Activists in KwaThema ft Veronica Noseda_0659

Photo by Liza Mokae (2014)

Spent the day with young queer youth in KwaThema.
Thanks to Lebo Mashifane for organizing the event.

Posted in 20 Years of Democracy in SA, Activists, Activists Act, After party, Another Approach Is Possible, Archived memories, Art Activism, Art Is A Human Right, Art is Queer, Articles, Beauty, Visibility, Visual activism, Visual Activist, Visual democracy, Visual diaries, Visual history, Visual history is a Right not a luxury, Visual Language, Visual narratives, Visual Power, Visual sense, Visual Voices, Warmth, We Are You, We Care, We love photographs, We Still Can with/out Resources, We were (t)here | Leave a comment

2014 Oct. 17: SA Fashion Week photo of the night

 

Ally & Toya DaLezy @ SA Fashion Week, Crowne Plaza, Rosebank. © Zanele Muholi (2014)

Ally & Toya DaLezy @ SA Fashion Week, Crowne Plaza, Rosebank.
© Zanele Muholi (2014)

Posted in 20 Years of Democracy in SA, 2014 SA Fashion Week, Abantu, Act, Acting, Activists Act, Affair, Allies, Ally & Toya DaLezy, Another Approach Is Possible, Art Activism, Art Activism in South Africa, Article, Articles, Articulation, Artists, Arts, Arts & Culture, As we are, Attention, Beautiful, Beautiful faces, Beautiful people, Before US, Before You, Black Queer & Gifted, Blackness, Bringing photography to the community, Captioned, Captured, Caring citizens, Celebrating Women, Celebration, Characters, Citizenship, Claiming mainstream spaces, Class, Consideration, Conversation, Creating awareness, Culture of reading and writing, Dress sense, Emotional support, Empowerment, Event, Evidence, Excitement, Experience, Exploration, Expression, Fashion, Fashionista, Feelings, Female Photographers, Friends, Friendships, Gender articulation, Gender expression, He(ART), Health bodies, Honesty, Hope, Human Beings, Human rights, I can't do it ALONE, I was (T)here, I was here, Interpretation, Intervention, Knowledge, Label, Life, Life story, Living, Love, Love is a human right, Love is Queer, Loved, Mainstream media, Photographs, Photography, Photography as a therapy, Platform, Politics of existence, Politics of representation, Power of the Arts, Power of the Voice, Pride, Privilege, Proud to be, Race, Recognition, Reflections, Relationships, relative, Self-worth, Sexual orientation, Sexuality in South Africa, Sharing knowledge, Sharing thoughts, She, South Africa, Speaking for ourselves, Statement, Style, Time, Together we can, Togetherness, Touch, Visibility, Vision, Visual Activist, Visual Arts, Visual diaries, Visual history, Visual history is a Right not a luxury, Visual Language, Visual Power, Visual sense, Visual Voices, Visualizing public spaces, Visuals, We Are You, We Care, We love photographs, We Love Photography, We Still Can with/out Resources, We were (t)here, Well organized event, When Love is a Human Right | Leave a comment

2014 Oct. 15: Dignified funeral for LGBTI and HIV activist

by Lerato Dumse

Kind, compassionate, diligent and loving are some of the words used by speakers, to describe Musa Williams (47).

How he performed his duties at work, and his activism fighting for the rights of LGBTI and HIV positive people.

They were talking during his funeral on Wed. October 15, held at his home in Kwa-Thema, where he died suddenly a week before.

The funeral service started with less than 10 people, who sang in the lounge where Musa’s coffin stood.

People were then given an opportunity to view him for the last time, before moving to the tent where the full program was carried out.

Fani Masemula was first to talk, speaking on behalf of the family.

He said they were saddened by Musa’s passing, but realised it is the community he helped that has suffered the biggest loss.

Next on the program was a neighbor Sibusiso who said, Musa was a brother and a friend to him.

He added that Musa taught him how to handle tough times, and Musa’s passing is his first test at handling such a situation.

Nontyatyambo Makapela shared memories of Musa, when he joined them in establishing TAC in KwaThema.

How he used his own resources to mobilize people, even though he was part of the National Association of People Living with HIV and AIDS (NAPWA).

She said that was testament of Musa’s passion in helping those affected by HIV in his community.

Just like the meaning of his name, Nontyatyambo said she saw him practice kindness in other people’s lives.

 

2014 Oct. 15 Thokozile Khulwane_9683

Mrs Thokozile Khulwane preaching during the funeral service…

“Musa had characteristics of a leader, he was able to save many lives and prove that HIV doesn’t kill, but societal stigma does,” she concluded.

While long time friend, Sevi Makhonjwa said Musa’s life purpose was to serve people and “God must be giving him a lots of correct ticks because he stepped up to his call.

Sevi spoke about how they were together with Musa burying another friend and activist Manku Maduwane just last month, not far from Musa’s home.

With the funeral service at home wrapped up, mourners then proceeded to Vlakfontein Cemetery.

 

Pastor T. Moema who prayed at the funeral service of Musa Williams

Pastor T. Moema who prayed at the funeral service of Musa Williams

 

2014 Oct. 15 Lindeka Qampi @ Musa s place_9673

Lindeka Qampi, photographer who documented the service for Inkanyiso

 

Members of the LGBTI community, HIV activists and colleagues he worked with as community health care workers, marched some distance in front of the hearse singing.

There was a slight drizzle, which looked threatening when mourners arrived at the cemetery.
However this did not disrupt the smooth service, as the sun soon came out shining.

While some worked hard with spades to cover Musa’s grave, others continued singing, saying their final goodbye to a man they called IQHAWE!

 

2014 Oct. 15 Ingubo _9894

Musa’s coffin wrapped with blue blanket as a sign of respect for the late activist…

 

 

Supporters_9905

Young queer leaders and activists from KwaThema and surrounding areas came in full support…

 

Supporters_9913

 

Indlu yokugcina_9938

                                   Final resting place for Musa, “You’ll never be forgotten…”                                                      © Photos by Zanele Muholi (2014)

 

 

 

Previous article

 

2014 Oct. 13: Mother of the recently murdered lesbian demands justice

 

 

and

 

 

2014 Sept. 28: An emotional farewell for the recent victim of hate crime

 

 

and

 

 

2014 Sept. 8: Manku and her niece buried next to each other

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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2014 Oct. 15: “Young, Gifted and Gay”

by Lerato Ntlatlane-Malibe

It is funny how as people we are covered by different labels. When people discover that I am gay, comments I normally receive are “but you are so feminine and pretty”.

Really!
As a writer/columnist for a certain newspaper; there was point where I felt like writing these articles was getting me nowhere. But when I was about to give up, someone would come asking for my help. That encouraged me, and made me realise that out of a hundred negative comments I receive, there is one that is positive- and I will keep on writing for that one positive comment I receive.

As gay people we experience a lot of prejudice, it breaks us at times. But one thing that we are honest with ourselves. There is no better way to live your life than being true to yourself. People often ask us to explain our past, to explain our children forgetting that self discovery is a journey, and a journey that takes a million steps. In those steps you make mistakes, in those steps you realise that somethings are not for you and after that you hunt for who you are. In those steps we fall, we get up, we run, we get weary but journey on.

I want to tell everyone in the gay community that they might gossip about us but we are honest about who we are.

We are honest about our identity. So raise your head and walk with pride.
Do not let anyone pull you down, because they cannot handle your living an honest life.
Do not let anyone make you feel inferior because they are ignorant and choose not to understand.
We did not create ourselves, we did not choose to be gay and we will not hide ourselves. We did not commit any crime, we did not murder anyone we are just answering nature’s call on how to live our lives.

I had a problem with being labelled. But with time these labels made me work harder. These labels made me walk tall. These labels made me answer my natural and spiritual calling. People who call me names start realising that these names are not my education, my character, my spirituality and my overall being.

I always thank God that he gave me the wisdom to come to terms with who I am. He is the one  who created me to be. I am thankful that I don’t have to love and live my life in secret. This is who I am. I am young, I am gifted and I am proudly LESBIAN…..

 

About the author: I am proud that I am gay, because people say “wow but you are such a lady”. I am proud I am a spiritual healer, because people say “wow but you are so young and so pretty”. I am proud that I am mother, because people say “wow but you married to a woman”. I am proud that I am a writer and a performing poet because people say “wow you look so clean”. I am proud that I confuse the stereo type mind of this world.

 

 

Previous articles by Lerato

 

2014 March 5: Lesbian Femmes and Bags

 

 

 

Posted in Another Approach Is Possible, Archived memories, Arguments, Article, Articulation, As we are, Attention, Awareness workshops, Background, Black Lesbian, commit, Creating awareness, Education, Empowerment, Evidence, Experience, Exposure, Expression, Facing You, Feelings, Female being, Feminine, Friends, Friendships, Gender expression, Gender naming, God, Grateful, Gratitude, Homosexuality, Human Beings, Human body, Human rights, I Am, I am Somebody, I can't do it ALONE, I was (T)here, Identity, Ignorance, Intervention, Journey, Knowledge, Label, Language, Lerato Ntlatlane-Malibe, Love, Love is a human right, Loved, Lovely words, Mainstreaming our queer issues, Married, Memory, Our lives in the picture, Prejudice, Pride, Proud lesbian, Proud to be, South Africa, Warmth, We Are You, We Care, We Still Can with/out Resources, We were (t)here, When Love is a Human Right, Words, Writing is a Right, Young | 1 Comment

2014 Oct. 13: Mother of the recently murdered lesbian demands justice

Text by Lerato Dumse
Photos by Zanele Muholi 

A suspect is due to appear in the Tsakane Magistrate Court today (October 14), in connection with the fatal stabbing of Phumzile Nkosi (27) on October 2, 2014.

 

Umfundisi_9421Pastor Dlamini led the funeral service…

Daveyton Uthingo members_9479Members of Daveyton Uthingo, were there to grieve with the family and friends, standing in front Funo, Pride, Pearl, Sicka and Lesiba.

Musa Williams_9401Musa Williams from EPOC LGBTI spoke deeply at the funeral…

Activists sadness_9410Activists came to support the grieving family…

Miriam _ Phumzile s mom_9474Miriam Nkosi, the victim’s mother arriving at Vlakfontein cemetery…

 

Malindi & Nontyatyambo_9434

 

Family support and coffin_9405

 

Phumzile Nkosi s coffin_9457

 

Activists in action_9550

 

 

phumzile laid to rest_9487

 

Activists singing in support of the family_9516

Thuli the activists_9556

 

Welcome to Tsakane_9605

 

Family and relatives_9406
Phumzile, a lesbian mother of two boys aged 8 and 9years old, was laid to rest at Vlakfontein cemetery, after a service at home on October 12.

For Miriam Nkosi (54) the funeral of her youngest child meant she had buried four children, three of them killed in violent crimes.

Miriam says she was fetched from her house around 7pm and told that Phumzile had been stabbed in Extension 19, Tsakane, not far from her section in the same township.

When /Inkanyiso visited the family, before documenting the funeral, Miriam only had second hand information, on what happened to her daughter that fateful lateThursday afternoon.

She explained that Phumzile had left home earlier that day and said she was going to visit a friend.

Miriam says she arrived in Ext 19 to find her daughter lying on the street, facing up and dead, while people surrounded her from a distance.

She says it was when she turned her over that she saw the stab wound, while hearing a policeman demand the cloth, used to clean Phumzile’s blood in the house she was allegedly stabbed from, before being moved her to the street.

She added that she wants justice for Phumzile’s death.

 

abazalwane_9472

 

linda mankazana_9540

 

Phumzile Nkosi_9603Rest in peace… Phumzile Nkosi…
We will always remember you!!!

 

 

 

 

Posted in 'We live in fear', 20 Years of Democracy in SA, a black lesbian, Abantu, Acceptance, Activists, Addiction, African, African Queer Beauty, Alternative family, an LGBTI organisation, Anger, Another Approach Is Possible, Archived memories, Archiving Queer Her/Histories in SA, Art Activism, Articles, Articulation, Attention, Audience, Background, Beautiful, Beautiful faces, Beautiful people, Beauty, Before US, Before You, Begging, Being conscientized, Bereavement, Betrayal, Black bodies, Black Bodies of Silence, Black Lesbian, Black lesbian activism, Black Lesbian mother, Black lesbian murder, Black Lesbians, Black Queer Born Frees in South Africa, Bleeding, Body Politics, Brutal murders of black lesbians in SA, Brutality, Church is not the closet, Claiming, Claiming blackness, Claiming mainstream spaces, Coffin, Corruption, Court appearance, Creating awareness, Crime, Crime rate, Crimes, Daveyton Uthingo, EPOC lgbti, Evidence, Facilitation, Facilitators, Facing abuse and violation, Families and Friends, Family loss, Family support, Feelings, Friendships, Funeral, Gauteng, Gender articulation, Gender Based Violence (GBV)., Gender expression, Generations, Hate Crimes, Heroes of our struggle, Homosexuality, Honesty, Human Beings, Human rights, Humiliation, I can't do it ALONE, I was (T)here, I was here, I-N-K-A-N-Y-I-S-O, Inconsiderate, Independence, Johannesburg, Killer is another woman, Language, Legacies of Violence, Lerato Dumse, Lesbian Love Is Possible in South Africa, Mourning love, Songs of Freedom, South Africa, Stabbed to death, Tears, Tsakane, Violent crime, We Are You, We Care, We Love Photography, We Still Can with/out Resources, We were (t)here, What black lesbian youth wants, When home is a crime scene, When Love is a Human Right, young women, Young Women and Visual Activism, Youth, Youth voices | 2 Comments

2014 Oct. 13: The most exquisite Miss & Mr Gay Daveyton 2014

by Lerato Dumse

Sitting in a high chair and waiting for the pageant to start, Mapaseka Mthunzi braved the cold Friday night weather, to watch her daughter Sharon “Sicka Star-Ban”.

Sicka is one of the fourteen participants in the third Mr & Miss Gay Daveyton 2014, which took place on October 3, Two tone a popular lounge from the township.

Sicka_1707

Mapaseka says accepting and supporting her lesbian daughter, as well as showing how proud she is as her mother, made her come to the event.

She shares that its also part of Sicka Star-ban’s birthday presents, having celebrated her 20th birthday recently.

“I want to see how the LGBTI community lives, because what is important to my child like this pageant,  is also important to me,” adds Mapaseka.

While Jos’phine Thebyane and her three daughters occupied the front row seats, ready to show support to younger sister Christina “PR Chrissie”.

Jos’phine says she supports her daughter, because being lesbian is her choice.

She said other children end up committing suicide because of families not being supportive of their sexual orientation.

While Kgomotso Mashapa’s mother said it was her first time watching her child on the ramp, participating in the Miss Gay Daveyton category.

Thabo Kgomotso Somizi_1725

The winners are: (Left to Right) Thabo Mathenjwa, Kgomotso Mashapha and Somizy Sincwala.

 

Kgomotso’s mother reveals that she also entered beauty pageants such as Miss Daveyton and Miss Ellerines in the 80s, and was crowned as a 2nd princess.

After doing an introduction wearing their casual wear, contestants surprised and impressed the audience, when they walked on stage wearing African traditional regalia from the ÍsiZulu, Siswati, SePedi culture and African tribal print.

Organiser, Lesiba Mothibe says the traditional wear made its debut to the show as part of the 20years of Heritage celebrations in South Africa.

Lesiba adds that it is also to dispel myths that homosexuals are not African.

“I saw the pride on the contestants as they walked on stage,” continues Lesiba.

She explains that hosting this pageant is part of her activism.

“I’m saying to people of Ekurhuleni Municipality, we are here to stay and living proof that God continues to bless us, which is evidenced in the many talents we have in our LGBTI community,” Lesiba says.

The first Miss Gay Daveyton was hosted in 2003, with Lesiba taking home the title.

It was only in 2013 that the second one was held, and Lesiba says it took her three years to plan for it.

Making personal sacrifices is required when organising an event with a limited budget, she adds.

Elaborating on her passion for showing the existence of feminine gay men and transwomen.

Echoing her sentiments, fellow organiser, Nomsa Themba talks about the pressure of helping to organise a pageant.

She outlines finding the right venue, the ramp, marketing the event and working with contestants and their different characters, as one of the major challenges.

Labelz Glamore was able to keep the audience in stitches with her witty humor, as MC of the event.

Vuvu Nhlanhla Siphiwe_1500
The contestants looked elegant in their evening wear.
Lesiba explained that its about glamor, and to show how they will look when attending red carpet events.

Lesiba said the pageant needs a Queen who can carry the baton forward as well as a King who can stand up against hate crime.

After contestants were asked randomly selected questions, it was time to crown the winners.

 

 

 

 

 

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